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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
the lines of what spain did or ireland or greece, cut back our social programs dramatically. we'll have to do what the rest of europe will do over time, which is accept a lower standard of living forever everybody which is why the longer-term plan is so vital, not the short-term craziness. because everybody knows he we can't keep providing americans with the current level of services unless we raise taxes in a big way on erin and cut spending somehow. even the democrats are unwilling to consider that kind of tax cut. that's why long-term spending cuts are so important. they figure into the job creation of the next 25 to 30 years, and the ability of people to stay out of poverty longer term. in the meantime, you can't get the growth needed for government receipts to go higher even in the near term. put simply, if you got someone from honeywell or eaton or celgene in the rule, explain the impact. the imperative would be to get this fiscal cliff done before vacation. hey, listen, yes, no vacation without legislation. because the longer the delay the fewer reasons to start a business and th
that italy and greece would be following in disaster. of course, they subsequently turned out to be the single best places to invest for fixed income in the world. not only did the sky not fall, but you had to do some serious buying to keep up with the others around the world. we have been buying an etf for my travel trust. was there a more uniform agreement than the idea that the euro had to die and the weaker countries were going into a fre depression? we know a ton of countries that could do very well in a low-growth environment. a year ago all the wise guys were telling us to avoid china because it was a house of cards. the course only grew more uniform with the chinese market falling to multiyear lows. but in the last few weeks, china's economy bottomed during the summer as they were focused way too much on beating inflation. now it's become the best performer in the world, and i don't think you've missed the move which is why my trust has been buying an etf that mimics china. finally there's apple. we've become addicted to apple. we are deeply focused on its decline whic
was supposed to vanish by this time with the secret sellers around the country. i thought greece was supposed to be kicked out of the union. instead, my advice, do what my charitable trust did today, buy european stocks. you know where else there's much more to come? yep, oh boy was this one a hated one coming into this year. yeah, you know what i'm talking about, china. how about that economy over there? after pausing because the government was busy whipping inflation, now, thank you, late gerald ford, now it's coming on strong. i think growth in china's accelera accelerating. the stock market might be the most undervalued in the world. the stock market entirely could be under valued. how many short sellers told you to do the opposite and sell that market? after the steam roller it's been of late, what exactly are the short sellers saying now? i don't know, i'm not hearing them clearly. i'm not listening. i'm not, no, i'm not hearing. europe and china both were supposed to slip into oblivion in 2012. that was the easiest story, everybody wrote it. turned out two fabulous places to invest. ho
maybe, the worst is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece or portugal or spain or italy that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected, so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere, sometime, something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic perma-bear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watched the market make people way too much money to ever be that cynical and close-minded. being negative all the time has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that should change now. there are a handful of incredibly smart, professional short sellers, hats off, able to turn pessimism into profits but i don't recommend
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)